Irepa 2012 Professor Massimo Spagnolo, managing director of IREPA ONLUS, keynote speaker at the european parliament on fishery management in the Mediterranean Sea

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Professor Massimo Spagnolo, managing director of IREPA ONLUS, keynote speaker at the european parliament on fishery management in the Mediterranean Sea
Monday, 03 December 2012 09:23

Bruxelles, 29 November 2012 – The Fishery Commission of the European Parliament, soon to express its view on the reform of the Common Fishery Policy, organized a workshop on the management of fisheries in the Mediterranean sea.


Professor Massimo Spagnolo, managing director of IREPA, delivered a keynote speech highlighting possible regulation revisions to reach sustainable fishery practices.

After providing an overview on how fishery management evolved in the Mediterranean – from territorial fishing rights of the Spanish Cofradias, the French Prud’hommies and the Italian Consortia for Mollusk management and for Artisanal Fisheries – and analyzing the various segments of fisheries (small coastal fisheries and offshore fisheries on shared and non-shared stocks), prof. Spagnolo examined possible changes in small coastal and offshore fisheries management on shared and non-shared stocks.

The implications of introducing catch and effort quota, proposed by the European Commission, were also discussed. Prof. Spagnolo illustrated how quota may enhance the efficiency of management authorities only within specific management plans.

More specifically, effort quota could be assigned on multispecific stock fisheries, while in monospecific stocks – like shrimp fisheries in the Sicilian Channel, or small pelagic fisheries in the Adriatic – catch and possibly effort quota may be more suitable.

Management plans may be adopted by States when resources are not shared with others, or by the European Council when resources are shared by Community fleets. With Croatia joining the UE, this could be the case in Northern and Central Adriatic where Italian, Croatian and Slovenian fleets compete for the same resources.

In the Sicilian Channel, where fleet from Community and non-Community vessels target the same stock, the General Fishery Commission for the Mediterranean holds the responsibility to draft management schemes on an appropriate scale and over selected stocks.

This contribution provided MPs of the Fishery Commission a precious general overview of the specific issues of Mediterranean fisheries and of the possibilities and implications of management proposals for the upcoming Common Fishery Policy.